Kryptonite - Kryptonite

Kryptonite cover
Kryptonite
Kryptonite
Frontiers Music Srl
2017
6.5
Average: 5.3 (45 votes)
Oh boy, yet another of those Frankenstein bands was assembled somewhere in the offices of Frontiers Records somewhere in south Italy, by none other than the label’s boss and the ever present, writer, producer, keyboard player Alessandro Del Vecchio. Focused on Swedish talent they plucked the talented Jakob Samuel (The Poodles, Talisman) and his former “canine” band buddy Pontus Egberg on bass, who’s now moved on to King Diamond and Treat and rounded it all up by adding Robban Back (Mustasch, ex-Sabaton, ex-Eclipse). Having also Palace on the label meant that Mike Palace, whose also contributing as a writer in a variety of projects was drafted in.
 
On paper it’s a “dream team”… but because we’ve seen sleeper “hits” and narrow “misses” by a lot of projects that have not grown organically, taking an actual listen before forming frothy foam in the mouth is probably the way to go…
 
Single “Chasing Fire” has a decent chorus and feels like something that could have been on one of the later The Poodles albums, without being way too exciting, but what’s odd is the little “tribute” to “Shot in the Dark”... in the middle of it all. It ends up winning you, in the end...
 
“This is the Moment” is another decent attempt, but having a band that would shine doing “wimpy” power metal to lame mid-tempo melodic rock/metal, isn’t helping them; they pull it off capably, but just don’t impress while doing so…
 
“Keep the Dream Alive” tries to get things “anthemic”, but its lazy tempo and riddled with clichés verses, keep it from being a cracker. It has a perfectly good solo, but I wish it was a little more focused.
 
“Fallen Angels” is even more laid back – expecting JS to pull it off… he gives it his best shot and manages to make this soft rocker quite bearable.
 
“Across the Water” again relies on Samuel’s ability for the most part, as its mid-tempo sloppiness makes things hard to bear, outside the bounds of the chorus.
 
There’s half a good song in “Love Can be Stronger”, but it does feel a bit forced after all…
 
“Knowing Both of Us” is the obligatory piano ballad that Samuel pulls of easily, a separation song that sounds bittersweet.
 
“Get Out, Be Gone” tries to inject the album with some “juice”, but while it manages to do that, the chorus sounds pretty dumb… too little too late I guess…
 
And things just slip back to AOR inspired smoothness on “One Soul” with Samuel’s trying his best to make things work, which he does.
 
“Better than Yesterday” tries also to up the ante while maintaining a high amount of melody; actually the album seems to struggle a bit past the first few and stronger songs, with the occasional good moment, but lacking in consistency…
 
Which makes the placement of the rather heavier “No Retreat, No Surrender” at the very end a little odd… the “eastern” melody is neat, but something is amiss, in this poodle reject (I would imagine)…
 
All in all, Kryptonite proves that Jacob Samuels is a great vocalist (and drummer too) able to make almost everything he sings sound good, but it also goes to prove that past their third album, The Poodles have really started to lose a lot of their pelt and gut instinct that allowed the initial trio of albums by them to be a fantastic example of melodic metal done right…

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