atmospheric rock

The 69 Eyes unveil first album trailer and announce Fall 2019 Finnish Tour

Finland’s dark rockers The 69 Eyes recently announced that they will release their 12th studio album on September 13th, 2019. Right in time for their 30th band anniversary, “West End” will see the light of day, so prepare for 11 up-tempo rock anthems full of heaviness, black memento mori moments and dark humour featuring several top-notch guest vocalists including Cradle Of Filth’s Dani Filth, Wednesday 13 and Beastö Blancö’s Calico Cooper.

Berwanger releases music video for new single “When I Was Young”

Kansas City’s Berwanger (Josh Berwanger of Radar State, The Only Children, The Anniversary) is debuting a new song and music video of his just-announced new full-length “Watching A Garden Die”, out June 28th, 2019, on Wiretap Records.

Watch the video for “When I Was Young” below.

The track also features Jay Russell and Casey James Prestwood of Hot Rod Circuit on bass and pedal steel, respectively.

TheNightTimeProject releases music video for new single “Final Light”

Melancholic progressive rock supergroup TheNightTimeProject have streamed their new single from their second album, “Pale Season”, due for release on June 28th, 2019, via Debemur Morti Productions.

The band has released a new single and video for “Final Light” - watch it below.

Afire releases new music video for “The One to Take the Fall”

Hard rock/heavy group from Northern Finland Afire releases new music video to their track “The One to Take the Fall”, from their 2018 debut album “On the Road from Nowhere”.

The band features members from well known Finnish metal acts like Sentenced, KYPCK, Poisonblack and Brüssel Kaupallinen.
 
The video is shot in a barren, abandoned factory hall and directed by Teemu Hostikka from NTRNZ Media.

Watch the music video for “The One to Take the Fall” below.
 

Russian Circles to release new studio album “Blood Year” on August 2nd 2019

Russian Circles named their 2016 album “Guidance” in reference to the uncertainty of the future. It was a fitting title for the times, with the album coming out a few months before America’s tumultuous presidential election, but it was intended more as a reference to the band’s own absence of a blueprint as they navigated their second decade as a band than as a social commentary.